Defective Tire Recall and Registration System is Broken

By: Zack Hendon | Posted on: December 10, 2015 9:00 am

The NTSB (National Transportation Safety Board) found in an investigation that 3.2 million tires were recalled between 2009 and 2013 but unfortunately most drivers were unaware of the recall.

According to NTSB, the tire recall system is broken and needs a major overhaul. The problem is that there is no national system or database to identify recalled tires. If you take your car to a mechanic, the mechanic is not notified of recalls and neither is the consumer. It is left to each consumer to register all of their information with the manufacturer. NTSB has recommended that Congress require tire registration, including the consumer’s name, address, and tire identification number.

The tire ID number starts with the letters “DOT”. This Tire Identification Number (TIN) can also tell you the age of your tires which is an additional problem. Many manufacturers of cars recommend replacing tires that are six years old.

After the DOT, the next set of letters is the plant code, then the manufacturer identification number and then lastly the week and year the tire was made. For example the code 2613 means the tire was manufactured in the 26th week of 2013.

Proper inflation is also important for tires, especially in vehicle such as SUVs or vans that have a propensity to rollover.

I think this investigation and these facts show you really do have your life and the life of your loved ones riding on your tires. If the tire is unsafe for whatever reason, the vehicle is unsafe. Often times the most serious car wrecks we see in the greater Atlanta area including Cobb, Dekalb, Clayton, Henry and Forsyth Counties come from dangerous tires. Many head-on collision crashes are caused by tire defects. Feel free to contact The Hendon Law Firm, LLC is you have a question about an accident involving your tires. – Attorney Zack Hendon

If you have questions regarding an accident, please feel free to contact the Hendon Law Firm for a free consultation.

For more information about tire safety, visit safercar.gov.